Thursday, April 9, 2009

Day of Silence - 4.17.09

This is a guest post by Renee over at Womanist Musings:

The National Day of Silence is fast approaching. On April 17th to support our TLBG members, spend the day in silence and let the world know that there is a cost to the violence that they are forced to endure because we refuse to believe in the equality of all bodies.



We need to realize that each day a life is snuffed out somewhere on this planet for the supposed crime of loving another or their gender identity. It is far to easy to believe that because two marriage amendments were passed in one week that things are improving. The truth is no matter how many states pass same sex marriage the issues of homophobia and transphobia extend far beyond that. They include discrimination in housing, health care, education, employment, and in fact every sphere that you can possibly think of. This is why I am a huge advocate of ENDA.



What I love most about this idea is that this is an action that we can all participate in to show our solidarity and raise awareness directly in our communities. So many times people ask what can I do to show support. Well now you have an answer. On April 17 you can spend a day in silence reflecting on how are dissonance in worth and value wrongfully privileges certain bodies and allow your silence to speak the words that you may no be able to express.

12 comments:

Family Fairness said...

"It is far to easy to believe that because two marriage amendments were passed in one week that things are improving."

I think this is an incredibly important point. While we should always take a moment to celebrate our successes, we should never lose sight of our ongoing goals. Iowa and Vermont's victories are small consolation for the LGBT teens who are bullied and harassed daily in school. They do not make the decision about which public restroom to use easier for our trans community. They do not bring comfort to the employee forced to hide her sexual orientation because she cannot afford to lose her job.

Celebrating our victories is important because it reminds us that we can win. But lingering on them for too long does a disservice to our other efforts. I personally plan to spend this year's Day of Silence in contemplation of what small part I can play in helping to right these ongoing wrongs.

Anonymous said...

I am a bisexual 14 year old girl who understands the pain some have gone though.
Although I am not harassed very often, I have still been called all the names in the book: Fag, Dyke, Queer, etc.
I understand the sorrows that people have gone though just for Gay Rights, and that is exactly why I am taking a vow of silence.

Gay Pride, world wide. (:

WickedGayBlog.com said...

http://wickedgayblog.blogspot.com/2009/04/april-17th-gay-bloggers-united-in.html?showComment=1239816720000

Anonymous said...

i completely understand how difficult it is to get through life as a glbt... even though the people in my school are more excepting of glbt's... i will still be participating this year in national day of silence...
I am a bisexual who is 15 years old... & i cant stand it when i say i am bisexual, or when i say my dads r gay, people throw fits & if they r my "friends" they will completely turn into jerks! they will think differently about me & my family... & it makes me so mad... cuz they judge based on what they think... if everyone judged on say color or age or gender what kind of world would this be? it is exactly the same with the glbt's of this world... anyway this year for day of silence i will be showing my pride all day... i will be silent all day as well. i wont be saying anything but the words that i want be expressed around my school will be "look at me. i am different. & whether you like it or not is your problem. we need equality in this world and i am working towards it one day at a time"

carsonmaier said...

no one should have been treated like carl joseph walker hoover. no one no matter what. every way you live your life is normal. remember that.

Anonymous said...

My two best friends are both bisexuals, while I am straight. Both of them get called names and sometimes I do too, just because i'm a friend. Today one of my best friends and I spent the afternoon making shirts for Day of Silence. (: They're very colorful and they came out amazing.

GAY PRIDE<3

Anonymous said...

Today (Aug 16th) is actually the first day i have ever heard of this. I believe it is a great idea. Not only in High Schools but there after as well. I have lost 3 jobs because someone whom I was working with found out i was gay. Tomorrow while i am in class at this community collage i go to. I will be doing this, even if I am the only one.

jammie said...

zachhh...God hates people who judge you stupid ignorant jerk!

Anonymous said...

i believe in the day of Silence...my best friend is a lesbian and i love her to death no matter what her sexuality is...and fer all u Jesus freaks NO WHERE IN THE BIBLE DOES IT SAY GD HATES HOMOSEXUALS...ugh people can be so blody stupid...i mean i go to a bloody catholic college and they promote this day!!!

Anonymous said...

For those of you who participated I applaud you. I am a Professor of Sociology and we owe ourselves and the United States that we will pass on to make sure we the GLBT community are not treated any different than anyone else. The bible.. Aka.. The book of fairy tales says something doesn't mean its true... I truly believe the intolerant are the uneducated.

Anonymous said...

I tried to share my views at the so-called "day" on the Nebraska campus and was shouted down by queer students. I guess free speech and 'tolerance' extends only to those whose views are as twisted as yours...

Anonymous said...

I'd like to know what school the so-called professor works at. They need to send him to an English grammar class, but I guess all you need is the proper "PC" view on life and the rest doesn't count for much these days...

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